Saying “Hi!” to Kendyl

Kendyl Claycomb laughs with her mother, Crimson Claycomb. Kendyl contracted meningitis when she was three weeks old and suffered a brain injury called a periventricular leukomalacia that left her with cerebral palsy, epilepsy and a sensory disorder that makes it difficult to process certain stimulae.

Robert Moore

Herald Staff

[email protected]


Kendyl Claycomb has something she wants to tell the world.

“Hi!” she says.

Kendyl is the daughter of Jeff and Crimson Claycomb. She is five years old. She is a very busy little girl.

Four days a week, she goes to school. She only goes three hours a day, but there’s a lot that goes into it.

When Kendyl wakes up, she has to take medicine. She has to take a lot of it. Her mother said it takes up to 10 minutes to take it all.

Kendyl contracted meningitis when she was three weeks old. She suffered a brain injury called a periventricular leukomalacia that left her with cerebral palsy, epilepsy and a sensory disorder that makes it difficult to process certain stimulae. It can take Kendyl up to five minutes to say “Hi!”


Pick up a copy of this week’s Harrodsburg Herald or subscribe to our online edition for the rest of the story.

Leave a Comment